Companionship

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Companionship for Baby-Boomers

 

During the casual dating stage being with one another is generally the motivating force. As you spend time in companionship with your potential partner, you get to know what activities and interests they have in common with you, and what you don’t have in common. One does not need to have exactly the same interests in order for a long-lasting, healthy relationship, but they do need to have enough interests that they can share some activities together. This is an area where some differences is almost preferable; time spent apart pursuing activities not shared with one’s partner can be a refreshing and recharging break from one another for both parties.

In this initial stage of relationship the couple are attempting to develop a friendship—“a feeling of affection, esteem and regard for the other person.” A friendship has to be the foundation on which to build a relationship.

 

 

Companionship

 

 Companion, n.’ One with whom a person frequently associates and converses; a mate; a comrade; one who accompanies another’

‘Accompanying, united with’

The state of being with someone

v.t. ‘to be a companion to; to put on the same level’

 

I once read that companionship is where the person is more important than the activity the people are participating in. Doing things together is a necessary requirement in order to keep a relationship fresh and alive. The more things you do together, the more shared experiences with which to create memories, yet there has to be balance between too much togetherness and too much separation.

 

Thriving-Baby-Boomers - Companionship - In life, it's now where you go - it's who you travel with.

In life, it’s now where you go – it’s who you travel with.

 

One must genuinely like being with their partner in order to have a loving relationship. There is nothing more endearing to me than watching an elderly couple walk hand-in-hand through the park or the mall. They didn’t get there overnight, or by spending all their time apart. It took years of nurturing their relationship and genuinely liking and loving one another and sharing many, many activities together.

 

Thriving-Baby-Boomers - Companionship - Couple walking the railway tracks

Couple walking the railway tracks

 

Spending time in one another’s company in many different settings is the best way to really get to know your potential partner. During the early dating stages it’s a good idea to leave family and friends out of your socializing for at least a little while. Once you feel comfortable in one another’s presence, then it’s time to introduce your companion to family and friends involving social situations such as holidays and events. This has a couple of functions, first so your family and friends can meet the person in non-threatening situations, but also for them to get their own sense of the person in which they can give you feedback if your judgment seem to be clouded through rose-coloured glasses.

 

Other Aspects Of Companionship

a)   Comradery

b)   Familiarity

c)    Festivities

d)   Hospitality

e)   Intimacy and Casual Dating

f)   Social Activities

 

Noticing how you feel in their presence and during your interactions with them can be a good gauge of things to come if you continue to pursue the relationship.

 


 

I have written a whole chapter on Companionship in my upcoming book, The 8 Cs of Relationships.

For more information on when The 8 Cs of Relationships will be published (anticipated publication date late 2020) and where to pre-order your copy, please fill in the form here.

 

 

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