Yoga

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“Focusing on the whole person to maximize health and wellness for life.”

 

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Yoga for Baby-Boomers

 

Yoga is a form of gentle stretches and breathing that is suitable for people of all ages – including Baby-Boomers.

Yoga has been around for more than 5,000 years. According to WebMD, “yoga does more than burn calories and tone muscles. It’s a total mind-body workout that combines strengthening and stretching poses with deep breathing and meditation or relaxation.”

There are over 100 different forms of yoga.

WebMD shares examples of different yoga forms which include:

  • Hatha. The form most often associated with yoga, it combines a series of basic movements with breathing.
  • Vinyasa. A series of poses that flow smoothly into one another.
  • Power. A faster, higher-intensity practice that builds muscle.
  • Ashtanga. A series of poses, combined with a special breathing technique.
  • Bikram. Also known as “hot yoga,” it’s a series of 26 challenging poses performed in a room heated to a high temperature.
  • Iyengar. A type of yoga that uses props like blocks, straps, and chairs to help you move your body into the proper alignment.

 

I bought a book called The ABC of Yoga by Kareen Zebroff and practiced yoga back in the 80s. I haven’t done yoga in many years.

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(Image credit – InLifeHealthCare.com)

 

A few years ago, I decided to try a yoga class which was focused more on stretching, but even though we were encouraged to go only at our own pace and abilities, I had neighbouring classmates telling me what I was doing wrong, even though I had a painful shoulder from a mysterious injury. So I didn’t get a sense that one was ‘encouraged’ to go at one’s own pace and abilities.

 

These days, I find it just too difficult to get down on the floor and back up again for this movement therapy to be one that I can use.

 


I have noticed that as I have made a commitment to be proactive in looking after my health and attempting to get in some form of movement several times a week that my health is slowly but steadily improving. And I’m beginning to actually like and crave movement – who knew?

No matter what form of movement therapy you choose, make it fun, and only do as much as your body, fitness level, and pocketbook dictate.

 

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